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Crown Lengthening

Crown lengthening surgery is often required when your tooth needs a new crown or other restoration, but due to the position of, for example, decay or a fracture, the edge of the new restoration would be deep below the gum tissue and not accessible to your restoring dentist or to correct a gummy smile.

Without the crown lengthening procedure in these cases, the surrounding tissues will be chronically inflammed due to improper spacing between the base of the restoration and the bone.

 

The procedure involves adjusting the level of the gum tissue and bone around the tooth in question to create a new gum-to-tooth relationship. This allows the restoring dentist the access needed to reach the edge of the restoration, ensuring a proper fit to the tooth. It should also provide enough tooth structure so the new restoration is less likely to become loose in the future. Finally, this procedure, which usually takes about an hour, will allow you to clean the edge of the restoration when you brush and floss, thereby preventing decay and gum disease.

When the procedure is completed, resorbable sutures, and occasionally a protective bandage, are placed to help secure the new gum-to-tooth relationship. You will need to be seen one or two weeks later for us to evaluate your healing and provide you with further instruction in oral hygiene. Also, we will advise you when to return to your restoring dentist to complete your restoration.

The recovery time for this procedure is approximately three months. However, you’ll be able to resume normal functions as your gums heal. You only need to avoid strenuous activity for the first two to three days. A physically demanding job, heavy lifting, and heavy exertion could inhibit your healing and cause more bleeding.

Talk to your dentist about the specifics of your recovery. In general, follow these guidelines:

Take OTC or prescription medication: In your aftercare instructions, you’ll most likely be told to take pain-killers. The dentist may prescribe antibiotics, or extra-strength painkillers.

Use an ice pack: Using a pack on your face for the first few hours after the procedure can reduce swelling. Alternate use of the ice pack, following 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off.

Avoid hot foods for the first 24 hours: Also, don’t rinse your mouth. Both can make the bleeding last longer. If bleeding continues, use a moistened tea bag or moistened gauze to apply slight pressure to the area for 20 to 30 minutes.

If applicable leave dressings in for 7 to 14 days: The dentist may replace the dressing once or twice during this period.

Brush carefully: Gently brush only your biting surfaces where the dressing has been applied.
Avoid Brushing below your gums in the surgical site or flossing.
All other areas must be cleaned normally. Chew on the opposite side of your mouth from the dressing.

The Procedure

The procedure involves adjusting the level of the gum tissue and bone around the tooth in question to create a new gum-to-tooth relationship. This allows the restoring dentist the access needed to reach the edge of the restoration, ensuring a proper fit to the tooth. It should also provide enough tooth structure so the new restoration is less likely to become loose in the future. Finally, this procedure, which usually takes about an hour, will allow you to clean the edge of the restoration when you brush and floss, thereby preventing decay and gum disease.

When the procedure is completed, resorbable sutures, and occasionally a protective bandage, are placed to help secure the new gum-to-tooth relationship. You will need to be seen one or two weeks later for us to evaluate your healing and provide you with further instruction in oral hygiene. Also, we will advise you when to return to your restoring dentist to complete your restoration.

The Recovery

The recovery time for this procedure is approximately three months. However, you’ll be able to resume normal functions as your gums heal. You only need to avoid strenuous activity for the first two to three days. A physically demanding job, heavy lifting, and heavy exertion could inhibit your healing and cause more bleeding.

Talk to your dentist about the specifics of your recovery. In general, follow these guidelines:

Take OTC or prescription medication: In your aftercare instructions, you’ll most likely be told to take pain-killers. The dentist may prescribe antibiotics, or extra-strength painkillers.

Use an ice pack: Using a pack on your face for the first few hours after the procedure can reduce swelling. Alternate use of the ice pack, following 20 minutes on and 20 minutes off.

Avoid hot foods for the first 24 hours: Also, don’t rinse your mouth. Both can make the bleeding last longer. If bleeding continues, use a moistened tea bag or moistened gauze to apply slight pressure to the area for 20 to 30 minutes.

If applicable leave dressings in for 7 to 14 days: The dentist may replace the dressing once or twice during this period.

Brush carefully: Gently brush only your biting surfaces where the dressing has been applied.
Avoid Brushing below your gums in the surgical site or flossing.
All other areas must be cleaned normally. Chew on the opposite side of your mouth from the dressing.

Still have questions?


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